Balance


Posted on October 3rd, by S. Bartron-Miscione in Blog. 4 comments

BalanceI recently came to an obvious conclusion about attempting to move a still life: it really isn’t possible to duplicate exact conditions in another location. The light is going to be different, the placement of objects is going to be difficult to recreate in some cases, and impossible in other cases, such as with objects that are hanging — impossible!

I live and work in Brooklyn, NY and Sunset, Maine, the studios are completely different, but the way I can make that work for me, with as little interruption as possible to the workflow, is to have two works-in-progress, one in each location.

When I come home to Brooklyn, I will plug into the one that’s waiting on the drawing board there, and when I return to the island, Taming Wild, is waiting there. I think this is going to work well.

The painting in my Brooklyn studio titled: Balance, is a composition of rocks with a single, strong lighting source, which is possible there — so the obvious choice for dramatic lighting. The round shaped rocks, some oval, others spherical, are Maine granite tumbled to perfection by the wind, waves and cove configuration, on very special beaches that I’ve discovered during the exploration of islands in the archipelago near my island home on Deer Isle. They can be found in all sizes, with color combinations of grays and pinks, with a little blue here and there — all treasures. The flat, layered rocks are from the Frying Pan of Basalt, CO. I would describe the color on a spectrum of: shrimp to Flamingo oranges and pinks, with a little moderating rust — fabulous color, and absolutely stunning with a gold medal river running through the foothills.

I have arranged the rock pile to look precarious, thwarting the connotation of permanence, immortality and solidity. The places where my family lives now have the best indigenous rocks I’ve ever seen! My collection is huge and my paintings almost always have a rock element. The extrapolation of social commentary in this still life comes entirely from rocks — as if they could speak… and they can.





4 thoughts on “Balance

  1. I have arranged the rock pile to look precarious, thwarting the connotation of permanence, immortality and solidity. The places where my family lives now have the best indigenous rocks I’ve ever seen! My collection is huge and my paintings almost always have a rock element. The extrapolation of social commentary in this still life comes entirely from rocks — as if they could speak… and they can.

  2. The painting in my Brooklyn studio titled: Balance, is a composition of rocks with a single, strong lighting source, which is possible there — so the obvious choice for dramatic lighting. The round shaped rocks, some oval, others spherical, are Maine granite tumbled to perfection by the wind, waves and cove configuration, on very special beaches that I’ve discovered during the exploration of islands in the archipelago near my island home on Deer Isle. They can be found in all sizes, with color combinations of grays and pinks, with a little blue here and there — all treasures. The flat, layered rocks are from the Frying Pan of Basalt, CO. I would describe the color on a spectrum of: shrimp to Flamingo oranges and pinks, with a little moderating rust — fabulous color, and absolutely stunning with a gold medal river running through the foothills.

  3. I recently came to an obvious conclusion about attempting to move a still life: it really isn’t possible to duplicate exact conditions in another location. The light is going to be different, the placement of objects is going to be difficult to recreate in some cases, and impossible in other cases, such as with objects that are hanging — impossible!

  4. When I come home to Brooklyn, I will plug into the one that’s waiting on the drawing board there, and when I return to the island, Taming Wild, is waiting there. I think this is going to work well.

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